ICT4D

Exploring the role of ICTs and new media in development.

Re:thinking development with UCT: The choice is yours

I wrote in one of my earlier posts about the non-profit GiveDirectly, and particularly its Uncondititional Cash Transfer (UCT) programs in Kenya and Uganda. I praised these efforts because of the way they enable individuals to make their own choices. Recipients receive access to funds through mobile phones, and are …

How to tell a good story

As discussed in an earlier blog post, new media has changed the way we communicate with each other and how we consume information; our expectations of receiving information packaged in an attractive way have certainly increased. In the digital space where hundreds of stories are unfolding continually, you need to …

On the world’s first public digital meeting of female foreign ministers

“Without women there will be less development and less sustainable peace” Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallström made a name for herself – and her government – when she announced, in 2014, the world’s first ‘feminist foreign policy’. Coverage of this ‘feminist government’ consistently appear on international publications, and the foreign minister is …

Redefining dating: the humanitarians of Tinder

Looking for a date? Forget dazzling them with your wits, a photo of you posing with local children in Kenya or helping to build a school in Vietnam may serve as a better tactic. Popular dating app Tinder is all about first impressions – users’ profiles contain only photos and …

Reveal yourself: the trend of anonymous blogging

“They have a following because their readers know that they are speaking the truth. But their employers could not tolerate the truth, so these bloggers have to remain in the closet.” – Dennis Whittle, Huffington Post. Blogging is popular among development professionals from a variety of backgrounds. A study by …

A few lessons from Swedish Digital Diplomacy

In my recent blog post, I complained, at some length, about the continuing use of ‘the field’ in development speak. One of the criticisms raised concerned the fact that ‘the field’ fails to describe development as a process occurring as much in the global metropolises as in rural settings. So, …