Data for Development – contributions from the Nordic countries

OECD is one of the international institutions that makes use of data produced by our use of technology, such as mobile phones and internet, in their research and policymaking (Taylor and Schroeder, 2014, p. 505).

At the end of this month, on October 30th, OECD will release its Development Co-operation Report for 2017, Data for Development. In the introduction of the report, OECD stresses the importance of big data and the data revolution for development in a broad sense: “more and better data can help boost inclusive growth, fight inequalities and combat climate change. These data are also essential to measure and monitor progress against the Sustainable Development Goals.”

Furthermore, the report stresses the fact that the lack of good data is still evident in most developing countries, and asks central questions: Why are over half of deaths and one-third of births worldwide unaccounted for? Why is investment in statistical capacity (…) not a priority for most providers of development assistance?

The report calls for a strengthening of national statistical systems and will present measures to “make data work for development”.

The profiles of different countries’ contributions to data for development is already published. This post briefly looks at the contributions from the Nordic countries in the report: Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland.

Denmark
According to the report, more and better data is getting more important than earlier for Denmark when it comes to reporting on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Until now, it has not been a high priority. Denmark aims to “improve statistical production and promote the use of data by policy makers, civil society and citizens”.

During 2013-2015, Denmark committed on average 12,7 million USD per year to finance statistical capacities and systems in developing countries.

Norway
Norway contributes to strenghtening data for development through its national statistical institute, Statistics Norway. Among other things, Statistics Norway collaborates with the UN’s High Commissioner for Refugees “to establish international guidelines for collecting and producing statistics on refugees and internally displaced people.”

Norway aims to “improve statistical production and data literacy and to strengthen co-ordination among development partners” and it contributes in helping developing countries “to build up civil registration and vital statistics”.

This year, Statistics Norway participated in an expert panel meeting where it provided input to the Development Co-operation report, stressing the importance of building holistic and sustainable national statistical systems (p. 10 in Statistic Norway’s newsletter “International Development Cooperation at Statistics Norway”, June 2017).

Norway launched a white paper this year in where it stresses the importance of good data and statistics in development cooperation.

Norway committed on average 15,0 million USD per year in 2013-15 to finance statistical capacity building.

Countries where Statistics Norway has Institutional Cooperation:

Source: Statistic Norway’s newsletter, June 2017

Sweden
Data for development or building up statistical capacities is an important part of Sweden’s development work. It is included in Sweden’s Budget Bill and the new policy framework for Sweden’s development co-operation. Sweden contributes in improving statistical production and literacy in development countries and offers technical assistance and financial aid. Among other things, it gives financial support to the UN Global Pulse, “which harnesses big data for development and humanitarian action”.

Interestingly, Statistics Sweden has collaborated with Burkina Faso and Mali on establishing “continuous household surveys” to help building up statistical capacity.

Sweden committed on average 20,89 million USD per year to finance statistical capacity in 2013-15.

Finland
The OECD report does not contain any information on Finland’s contribution to data for development. Finland’s contribution this field therefore remains unanswered.

However, Finland contributed a much smaller amount of money than its Nordic neighbours (1,51 million USD per year in 2013-15) to statistical capacity building, which indicates that it is not a priority.

The full country profiles are available here: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/dcr-2017-en

References:

OECD (2017) Development Co-operation Report 2017: Data for Development, OECD Publishing, Paris. Retrieved 2nd October 2017 from http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/dcr-2017-en

Statistisk sentralbyrå (2017): International Development Cooperation at Statistics Norway: A newsletter from Statistics Norway’s Division for Development Cooperation, June 2017. Retrieved 2nd October 2017 from
https://www.ssb.no/omssb/samarbeid/internasjonalt-utviklingssamarbeid/_attachment/316124?_ts=15d36b4d518

Taylor, L., Schroeder R. (2015): Is bigger better? The emergence of big data as a tool for international development policy. GeoJournal 80: 503-528.