The effects of ICT4D in Disability Activism

In my previous blog posts, the emphasis was on the role and impact of social media, viral campaigns, hashtags and mobile applications in the context of digital activism. In my final post of this series, however, I will focus on disability activism and how it is influenced by ICT4D, while elaborating on some of the main points previously addressed and including some of the extracts of several interviews conducted with members of disability activism in Spain.

Continue reading “The effects of ICT4D in Disability Activism”

Group Post: The effects of Corona Virus on the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW)

For most women’s organizations, the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) is a magical part of the year, when they are granted access to the highest echelons of global policymaking. For two weeks, they organize side and parallel events, they participate in interactive dialogues with Member States and they lobby and advocate tirelessly. It is also an excellent opportunity for networking and building global coalitions on basically all issues that affect women – from economic independence to disability rights, combating violence against women and girls. Continue reading “Group Post: The effects of Corona Virus on the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW)”

Food as ‘Old Media’ and the Refugee Food Festival

Orange peel, cardamom, cinnamon, saffron, clover, parsley, mint, lavender…

Are you already smelling and/or tasting these ingredients? To what kind of dish would you add them? A main course? A dessert? Or a tea? Continue reading “Food as ‘Old Media’ and the Refugee Food Festival”

“Sweat, feces and gasoline” – What smells tells us about life in Moria

Access the podcast version of this article here https://soundcloud.com/sensory-activism

Smell is probably our most irrational sense, triggering an immediate reaction without any need for explanation or processing. To explain what goes on in Moria, Europe’s most infamous refugee camp and a testament to the failure of human rights and humanitarianism in the European Union, we could provide you with thousands of testimonies, videos, reports and studies. But all these resources are still unable to transmit the heinous feeling of being in Moria, knowing it exists despite all the rhetoric about protecting refugees. Smell, on the other hand, can be quite effective at describing the real hopelessness of a situation.  Continue reading ““Sweat, feces and gasoline” – What smells tells us about life in Moria”